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Skyfall

Lord Alfred Tennyson

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Soms komen werelden bijeen waarvan je misschien niet zo snel verwacht dat ze bij elkaar komen. Dat gevoel kreeg ik toen ik afgelopen week naar de James Bond film Skyfall zat te kijken. M. het grote opperhoofd van de 00 agenten, citeert tijdens een ‘hearing’ door de,  voor haar verantwoordelijke,  minister een strofe uit het gedicht ‘Ulysses’ van Lord Alfred Tennyson.

Het is overigens niet de eerste keer dat dit gedicht redelijk prominent in een film voorkomt. Al eerder was het te horen in Dead poets society, maar dat is een film (qua titel en inhoud) waar je een dergelijk gedicht eerder verwacht dan in een actiefilm.

Het gebruik van deze strofe sluit echter heel mooi aan bij waar het in deze scene van de film omgaat. Hoewel Ulysses en zijn zeemannen niet meer zo sterk zijn als in hun jeugd, zijn ze “sterk in wil” en worden ondersteund door hun vastberadenheid om verder “meedogenloos te streven, te zoeken, te vinden, en niet toe te geven”.

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Ulysses

 

It little profits that an idle king,

By this still hearth, among these barren crags,

Matched with an aged wife, I mete and dole

Unequal laws unto a savage race,

That hoard, and sleep, and feed, and know not me.

I cannot rest from travel;

I will drink Life to the lees.

All times I have enjoyed

Greatly, have suffered greatly, both with those

That loved me, and alone; on shore, and when

Through scudding drifts the rainy Hyades

Vext the dim sea. I am become a name;

For always roaming with a hungry heart

Much have I seen and known–cities of men

And manners, climates, councils, governments,

Myself not least, but honored of them all,–

And drunk delight of battle with my peers,

Far on the ringing plains of windy Troy.

I am a part of all that I have met;

Yet all experience is an arch wherethrough

Gleams that untraveled world whose margin fades

For ever and for ever when I move.

How dull it is to pause, to make an end,

To rust unburnished, not to shine in use!

As though to breathe were life! Life piled on life

Were all too little, and of one to me

Little remains; but every hour is saved

From that eternal silence, something more,

A bringer of new things; and vile it were

For some three suns to store and hoard myself,

And this gray spirit yearning in desire

To follow knowledge like a sinking star,

Beyond the utmost bound of human thought.

This is my son, mine own Telemachus,

To whom I leave the scepter and the isle,

Well-loved of me, discerning to fulfill

This labor, by slow prudence to make mild

A rugged people, and through soft degrees

Subdue them to the useful and the good.

Most blameless is he, centered in the sphere

Of common duties, decent not to fail

In offices of tenderness, and pay

Meet adoration to my household gods,

When I am gone. He works his work, I mine.

There lies the port; the vessel puffs her sail;

There gloom the dark, broad seas.

My mariners, Souls that have toiled, and wrought, and thought with me,

That ever with a frolic welcome took

The thunder and the sunshine, and opposed

Free hearts, free foreheads–you and I are old;

Old age hath yet his honor and his toil.

Death closes all; but something ere the end,

Some work of noble note, may yet be done,

Not unbecoming men that strove with gods.

The lights begin to twinkle from the rocks;

The long day wanes; the slow moon climbs; the deep

Moans round with many voices. Come, my friends,

‘Tis not too late to seek a newer world.

Push off, and sitting well in order smite

The sounding furrows; for my purpose holds

To sail beyond the sunset, and the baths

Of all the western stars, until I die.

It may be that the gulfs will wash us down;

It may be we shall touch the Happy Isles,

And see the great Achilles, whom we knew.

Though much is taken, much abides; and though

We are not now that strength which in old days

Moved earth and heaven, that which we are, we are,

One equal temper of heroic hearts,

Made weak by time and fate, but strong in will

To strive, to seek, to find, and not to yield.

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tennyson

Met dank aan http://www.poets.org, sparknotes.com en Youtube.
Advertenties

Dead poet society

De ultieme poëzie film

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Wat mij betreft is er geen enkele film die de poëzie meer eer aandoet dan Dead poet society van peter Weir uit 1989. Deze meermalen bekroonde film (waaronder een Oscar voor beste screenplay) zit vol prachtige gedichten. Het verhaal van een Engels professor die zijn studenten inspireert en ze de liefde voor de poëzie bijbrengt is van alle tijden en eigenlijk zou elke talendocent een voorbeeld moeten nemen aan deze John Keating.

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De gedichten die in de film voorkomen zijn:

Walden van Henry David Thoreau (1917 – 1862)

The road not taken van Robert Frost (1874 – 1963)

To the Virgins van Robbert Herrick (1591 – 1674)

O Captain! My Captain! van Walt Whitman (1819 – 1892)

Ulysses van Alfred Tennyson (1809 – 1892)

Shall I Compare Thee To A Summersday van William Shakespeare (1564 – 1616)

She walks in beauty van Lord (George Gordon) Byron (1788 – 1824)

scene uit A Midsummer night’s dream door Puck (1595/1596)

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Hieronder de scene van Puck uit A Midsummer night’s dream.

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If we shadows have offended,
Think but this, and all is mended,
That you have but slumber’d here
While these visions did appear.
And this weak and idle theme,
No more yielding but a dream,
Gentles, do not reprehend:
if you pardon, we will mend:
And, as I am an honest Puck,
If we have unearned luck
Now to ‘scape the serpent’s tongue,
We will make amends ere long;
Else the Puck a liar call;
So, good night unto you all.
Give me your hands, if we be friends,
And Robin shall restore amends.

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dead_poets_society

 

 

 

Allerlei aardige feiten over deze film kun je lezen op: http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0097165/trivia

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