Site-archief

Seamus Heaney

Ierse dichtersweek

.

In een Ierse dichtersweek zijn er twee zekerheden: W.B. Yeats en Seamus Heaney (1939 – 2013). Yeats was gister aan de beurt en vandaag Seamus Heaney. Deze dichter, toneelschrijver, vertaler en docent  ontving in 1995 de Nobelprijs voor de Literatuur. In 1966 debuteerde Heaney met  ‘Death of a Naturalist’ dat achtereenvolgens de Cholmondeley Award, de Gregory Award, de Somerset Maugham Award en de Geoffrey Faber Memorial Prize. Uit zijn debuutbundel ‘Death of a naturalist’ uit 1966 het gedicht ‘Follower’.

.

Follower

.

My father worked with a horse-plough,
His shoulders globed like a full sail strung
Between the shafts and the furrow.
The horse strained at his clicking tongue.

An expert. He would set the wing
And fit the bright steel-pointed sock.
The sod rolled over without breaking.
At the headrig, with a single pluck

Of reins, the sweating team turned round
And back into the land. His eye
Narrowed and angled at the ground,
Mapping the furrow exactly.

I stumbled in his hob-nailed wake,
Fell sometimes on the polished sod;
Sometimes he rode me on his back
Dipping and rising to his plod.

I wanted to grow up and plough,
To close one eye, stiffen my arm.
All I ever did was follow
In his broad shadow round the farm.

I was a nuisance, tripping, falling,
Yapping always. But today
It is my father who keeps stumbling
Behind me, and will not go away.

.

                                                                                                                                                                                                                         Seamus Heaney in 1970

Digging

Seamus Heaney (1939 – 2013)

.

Eerder deze week overleed Seamus Heaney, Iers dichter en Nobelprijswinnaar voor de Literatuur in 1995, In 1966 debuteerde Heaney met de bundel ‘Death of a Naturalist’ waaruit het onderstaande gedicht komt. Voor een uitgebreide analyse van het gedicht kijk je op http://www.shmoop.com/digging-heaney/summary.html onder Stanza.

.

Digging

.

Between my finger and my thumb
The squat pen rests; snug as a gun.

.

Under my window, a clean rasping sound
When the spade sinks into gravelly ground:
My father, digging. I look down

.

Till his straining rump among the flowerbeds
Bends low, comes up twenty years away
Stooping in rhythm through potato drills
Where he was digging.

.

The coarse boot nestled on the lug, the shaft
Against the inside knee was levered firmly.
He rooted out tall tops, buried the bright edge deep
To scatter new potatoes that we picked,
Loving their cool hardness in our hands.

.

By God, the old man could handle a spade.
Just like his old man.

.

My grandfather cut more turf in a day
Than any other man on Toner’s bog.
Once I carried him milk in a bottle
Corked sloppily with paper. He straightened up
To drink it, then fell to right away
Nicking and slicing neatly, heaving sods
Over his shoulder, going down and down
For the good turf. Digging.

.

The cold smell of potato mould, the squelch and slap
Of soggy peat, the curt cuts of an edge
Through living roots awaken in my head.
But I’ve no spade to follow men like them.

.

Between my finger and my thumb
The squat pen rests.
I’ll dig with it.
 
%d bloggers liken dit: