Site-archief

Dichters in verzet

Shelley en Whitman

.

Bijna 175 jaar geleden zei Percy Bysshe Shelley in zijn “Verdediging van de Poëzie” dat “dichters de niet-erkende wetgevers van de wereld zijn”. In de jaren daarna hebben vele dichters die rol ter harte genomen, tot op de dag van vandaag. Het waren oproerkraaiers en demonstranten, revolutionairen en soms ook opstellers van wetten. Dichters hebben commentaar geleverd op de gebeurtenissen van de dag, hebben stem gegeven aan de onderdrukten, rebellen en voerden campagne voor sociale verandering. Er zijn inmiddels vele klassieke gedichten bekend over protest en revolutie. Percy Bysshe Shelley’s eigen ‘The Masque of Anarchy’ is daarvan een mooi voorbeeld. Omdat het een nogal lang gedicht is (91 verzen van 4 regels elk) plaats ik hier een link naar de volledige tekst http://knarf.english.upenn.edu/PShelley/anarchy.html  zodat je , als je dat wilt, het na kan lezen.

Een andere klassieke dichter die een protestgedicht schreef is Walt Whitman (1819-1892). Whitman begreep hoe belangrijk democratie was en hoe kwetsbaar. In ‘Leaves of Grass’ zijn levenswerk (tijdens zijn leven herschreef hij dit werk, het verscheen in verschillende edities waarbij in de eerste editie 12 gedichten stonden en in de laatste editie meer dan 400!) is het gedicht ‘O a foil’d European Revolutionaire’ uit 1900 opgenomen. Hierin spreekt hij tot de revolutionaire krachten in Europa. Het werk van Whitman werd in de eerste helft van de 20e eeuw geïntroduceerd in de populaire Little Blue Book- serie. Hierin werd het werk van Whitman voor een breder publiek dan ooit tevoren toegankelijk. De Little Blue Book was een serie die socialistische en progressieve standpunten ondersteunde. De publicatie verbond de focus van de dichter op de gewone man en het empowerment van de arbeidersklasse.

.

To a foil’d European Revolutionaire
.
COURAGE yet, my brother or my sister!
Keep on—Liberty is to be subserv’d whatever occurs;
That is nothing that is quell’d by one or two failures, or any num-
ber of failures,
Or by the indifference or ingratitude of the people, or by any
unfaithfulness,
Or the show of the tushes of power, soldiers, cannon, penal statutes.
What we believe in waits latent forever through all the continents,
Invites no one, promises nothing, sits in calmness and light, is
positive and composed, knows no discouragement,
Waiting patiently, waiting its time.
(Not songs of loyalty alone are these,
But songs of insurrection also,
For I am the sworn poet of every dauntless rebel the world over,
And he going with me leaves peace and routine behind him,
And stakes his life to be lost at any moment.)
The battle rages with many a loud alarm and frequent advance
and retreat,
The infidel triumphs, or supposes he triumphs,
The prison, scaffold, garroté, handcuffs, iron necklace and lead-
balls do their work,
The named and unnamed heroes pass to other spheres,
The great speakers and writers are exiled, they lie sick in distant
lands,
The cause is asleep, the strongest throats are choked with their
own blood,
The young men droop their eyelashes toward the ground when
they meet;
But for all this Liberty has not gone out of the place, nor the
infidel enter’d into full possession.
When liberty goes out of a place it is not the first to go, nor the
second or third to go,
It waits for all the rest to go, it is the last.
When there are no more memories of heroes and martyrs,
And when all life and all the souls of men and women are dis-
charged from any part of the earth,
Then only shall liberty or the idea of liberty be discharged from
that part of the earth,
And the infidel come into full possession.
Then courage European revolter, revoltress!
For till all ceases neither must you cease.
I do not know what you are for, (I do not know what I am for
myself, nor what any thing is for,)
But I will search carefully for it even in being foil’d,
In defeat, poverty, misconception, imprisonment—for they too
are great.
Did we think victory great?
So it is—but now it seems to me, when it cannot be help’d, that
defeat is great,
And that death and dismay are great.
.
                                                                                                                                                                  Een van de vele uitvoeringen van ‘Leaves of Grass’.
Advertenties

La Belle Dame sans Merci

John Keats

.

In 1819 schreef de Engelse dichter John Keats de ballade ‘La Belle Dame sans Merci’. Hij gebruikte de titel van een veel oudere ballade uit ongeveer 1424 van de Franse dichter Alain Chartier getiteld ‘La Belle Dame sans Mercy’. Hoewel de titels dus vrijwel hetzelfde zijn is de inhoud van de beide gedichten volledig verschillend.

Het gedicht wordt beschouwd als een Engelse klassieker, stereotiep voor andere werken van Keats (1795 – 1821). Het vermijdt de eenvoud van de interpretatie ondanks de eenvoud van de structuur. Hoewel eenvoudig van structuur (slechts twaalf korte stanzas, van slechts vier regels elk, met een simpel ABCB rijmschema) , zit het gedicht toch vol raadsels en is het onderwerp van talrijke interpretaties geweest.

Keats maakt gebruik van een stanza van drie jambische tetrameters met de vierde dimetrische lijnen, waardoor de stanza een zelfstandige eenheid lijkt en waardoor de ballad een doelbewuste en langzame beweging heeft die aangenaam is om naar te luisteren. Keats maakt gebruik van een aantal van de stijlkenmerken van de ballad, zoals de eenvoud van de taal, herhaling en afwezigheid van details. Keats’s ‘zuinige’ manier om een ​​verhaal te vertellen in “La Belle Dame sans Merci” is het tegenovergestelde van zijn overdreven manier waarop hij bijvoorbeeld in ‘The Eve of St. Agnes’  schrijft.  Een deel van de fascinatie die door het gedicht wordt uitgeoefend komt voort uit het gebruik  van het understatement door Keats.

.

La Belle Dame sans Merci

.

O what can ail thee, knight-at-arms,
Alone and palely loitering?
The sedge has withered from the lake,
And no birds sing.

O what can ail thee, knight-at-arms,
So haggard and so woe-begone?
The squirrel’s granary is full,
And the harvest’s done.

I see a lily on thy brow,
With anguish moist and fever-dew,
And on thy cheeks a fading rose
Fast withereth too.

I met a lady in the meads,
Full beautiful, a fairy’s child;
Her hair was long, her foot was light,
And her eyes were wild.

I made a garland for her head,
And bracelets too, and fragrant zone;
She looked at me as she did love,
And made sweet moan

I set her on my pacing steed,
And nothing else saw all day long,
For sidelong would she bend, and sing
A faery’s song.

She found me roots of relish sweet,
And honey wild, and manna-dew,
And sure in language strange she said—
‘I love thee true’.

She took me to her Elfin grot,
And there she wept and sighed full sore,
And there I shut her wild, wild eyes
With kisses four.

And there she lullèd me asleep,
And there I dreamed—Ah! woe betide!—
The latest dream I ever dreamt
On the cold hill side.

I saw pale kings and princes too,
Pale warriors, death-pale were they all;
They cried—‘La Belle Dame sans Merci
Hath thee in thrall!’

I saw their starved lips in the gloam,
With horrid warning gapèd wide,
And I awoke and found me here,
On the cold hill’s side.

And this is why I sojourn here,
Alone and palely loitering,
Though the sedge is withered from the lake,
And no birds sing.

.

  John William Waterhouse (1893)

Walt Withman

Out of the Cradle Endlessly Rocking

.

In 2012 verwerkte Richard Bigus het gedicht ‘Out of the Cradle Endlessly Rocking’ van Walt Whitman (1819 – 1892) in het kader van de Poetry Month, op een bijzondere en creatieve manier tot een poetisch beeld. Hieronder zie je een door Bigus gesigneerd exemplaar van zijn bewerking die verscheen in een oplage van 65 stuks. Ze werden gedrukt in verschillende kleuren op Japans Hosho papier(dit papier krimpt niet wanneer het wordt bevochtigd en is zeer scheurbestendig).

In deze prachtige typografische weergave, heeft Bigus Whitman ’s poëtische visie genomen en er een visuele laag aan toegevoegd . Het boek is een van de mooiste en belangrijkste publicaties van Richard Bigus.

.

Out of the Cradle Endlessly Rocking

Out of the cradle endlessly rocking,
Out of the mocking-bird’s throat, the musical shuttle,
Out of the Ninth-month midnight,
Over the sterile sands and the fields beyond, where the child
leaving his bed wander’d alone, bareheaded, barefoot,
Down from the shower’d halo,
Up from the mystic play of shadows twining and twisting as
if they were alive,
Out from the patches of briers and blackberries,
From the memories of the bird that chanted to me,
From your memories sad brother, from the fitful risings and
fallings I heard,
From under that yellow half-moon late-risen and swollen as
if with tears,
From those beginning notes of yearning and love there in
the mist,
From the thousand responses of my heart never to cease,
From the myriad thence-arous’d words,
From the word stronger and more delicious than any,
From such as now they start the scene revisiting,
As a flock, twittering, rising, or overhead passing,
Borne hither, ere all eludes me, hurriedly,
A man, yet by these tears a little boy again,
Throwing myself on the sand, confronting the waves,
I, chanter of pains and joys, uniter of here and hereafter,
Taking all hints to use them, but swiftly leaping beyond them,
A reminiscence sing.

.

SONY DSC

SONY DSC

%d bloggers liken dit: